Power to Women in Peace Processes

Women's Organisations Cooperating in Realising Resolution 1325

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In december 2011, Ana Pashalishvili, from the office of the Georgian National Security Council, took part in the 1325 NAP negotiations.
FOTO: Privat

Civil Society integral part of Georgias newly adopted National Action Plan

The National Action Plan on resolution 1325 was finally approved on the 27th of December 2011 with 91 votes to 1 by the Parliament of Georgia after a long but very interesting process of its elaboration, which I was personally participating in, writes Ana Pashalishvili, from the office of the Georgian National Security Council.

Every Georgian would start talking about gender issues by mentioning that Georgia had a female king in the 13th century, that there were six female member of parliament in the first Parliament of 1919 of the Democratic Republic of Georgia[1] at the time when the women of some European countries did not even have right to vote, that the “Mother” is very much respected in Georgian society, that women in Georgia had always had free access to education, voting rights etc.

However, Georgian society is not free from traditional stereotypes on women’s role and the need for further protection of women’s rights and for increasing women’s participation has always been evident.

Political transformations include women

Even if there were some eventual attempts by the previous government, the gender equality policy failed to be elaborated or implemented due to lack of political will and weak support from the Parliament. Only after the Rose Revolution of 2003 the Georgian government started to develop a gender equality policy, together with other important reforms which are reflected in pronounced political, social, and economic transformations which happened and continue to happen in Georgia.

The reforms were aimed not only at making changes in political and economic systems, but also at transforming the mindset of Georgians from a soviet one to a progressive western one. This process, despite of being quite difficult, was unique in terms of speed of reforms, degree of innovations, and extent of institutional restructuring.[2]  

National Action Plan Finaly Adopted

At some stage the law on Gender Equality, National Action Plan on Gender Equality, law against trafficking, law against domestic violence and protection of victims of domestic violence, State Concept on Gender Equality etc were adopted. Gender equality issues were incorporated in some strategic instruments. The National Action Plan on resolution 1325 was finally approved on the 27th of December 2011 with 91 votes to 1 by the Parliament of Georgia after a long but very interesting process of its elaboration, which I was personally participating in.

Resolution 1325 is very important for Georgia since a big part of its territory is still occupied. There is a need to take effective actions to ensure security of the population, especially women and children, residing along the conflict zones.

The NAP development process was quite complex and at the same time productive, requiring a lot of resources, time, motivation, and hard work from every member of the group. A model of participation was established that created mechanisms of cooperation between governmental Working Group and civil society; all major ministries and the Parliament of Georgia were represented in the working group.

Consultations with civil society were integral part of the NAP development process. More than 25 NGOs were involved in the consultations. In total, numerous consultative meetings were held with approximately 102 organisations representing internally displaced persons (IDP’s) and conflict affected women in the regions Tbilisi, Qvemo Qartli, Shida Qartli, Imereti and Samegrelo.

1325 important tool in Georgian conflict resolution

The first NAP covers four years and will then be renewed. It sets out some very important objectives, such as supporting the increase of participation of women in decision making at all levels; considering women’s issues in conflict prevention mechanisms; eliminating gender based violence and sexual violence; promoting zero tolerance towards sexual violence against women and girls; ensuring political, economic, social and physical safety of conflict affected women and many more. 

This is the first stage for resolution 1325 in Georgia. The NAP will be slightly more focused on awareness rising of conflict affected people as well as the civil servants of different ministries but mainly of police and army and their training in women, peace and security issues. The next years will reveal which are the main challenges remaining and the next NAP will be more focused on addressing them.

We acknowledge that the path leading towards sustainable gender equality in our country is long and requires more and more efforts. But we are ready to face this challenge: we have strong will, positive dynamics, international support and very rich experience of our partner countries.

 

Ana Pashalishvili

Chief Adviser at Department of Human Rights, Minorities and Rule of Law

Office of the Georgian National Security Council

 

 

[1] Democratic Republic of Georgia was created on 26th May 1918 and existed till 25th February 1921. This was the period in between the Occupation of Georgia by Russian Monarchy and the occupation of Georgia by the Soviet Russia.

[2]  World Bank, April 2009, report No. 44400-GE